Top 5 tips to achieve your money goals in 2019

Take control of your future by setting some financial goals this year. Here are our top tips to help make 2019 your best year yet.

Make a plan for your money

What are your money goals for this year? To give yourself the best chance at achieving them, your goals need to be SMART: specific, measurable, achievable, realistic and timely. Setting timely goals means giving yourself a timeframe to achieve them.

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Kristy Paltridge
Top five small habits of highly successful investors

It has been said (and many books have been written about) that habits play a critical role in achieving success.

While it’s all well and good to set lofty goals, it’s the (seemingly) small and positive habits that we adhere to on a daily basis that will give us the best chance of success in the long run.

This truth applies equally to investing in the markets. It’s true that many investors set big goals and financial objectives, but how many do you think will stick to a daily habit to ensure that they are moving closer to those goals each day?

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Kristy Paltridge
Christmas Spending

Debt isn’t a welcome guest for any family at Christmas time. And yet blowing the budget and paying it all back next year is tempting when we’re trying to make it the best festive season ever. Get tips on how to keep your finances in the best of shape as you get ready for Christmas so you can enjoy a debt and stress-free new year.

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Home to roost: Advice for parents with adult kids living at home

Do you have adult children living with you? Thanks to housing affordability and stagnant wage growth, more kids are relying on Mum and Dad to keep a roof over their head well into their 20s and 30s. Get some advice on how to foster financial independence in your kids, so they’ll be ready to stand on their own two feet when they leave the nest at last.

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Kristy Paltridge
How to max your tax refund

Expecting a refund from your 2017/18 tax return? 77 out of 100 Aussies are likely to get one and many could already have plans to spend it. If you’re one of them, find out how to treat yourself right with your windfall and be better off for good.

For most of us, tax refunds rarely come as a complete surprise. In fact, sometimes we might even be using the ATO as an unofficial savings account, knowing we’ll get a quick cash windfall to reward ourselves for getting all that paperwork together and lodging a return.

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Kristy Paltridge
Investment checklist: Developing an investment strategy

No matter what stage of investing you are at, it’s important to have a strategy that matches your goals and personal needs and to keep checking that it’s working for you.

Here’s a checklist of issues and questions to help you along your investment journey:

Your destination

Are you clear on why you want to invest and what you want to achieve? For example, do you want to accumulate money to buy a car?

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Kristy Paltridge
Where does all my money go? Save money on your three biggest expenses

The three biggest drains on our money are paying for housing, food and transport. And there’s no getting away from the fact that it is unlikely we can live without any of the “big three”. Here we look at some ways of how to save on these items.

Saving on rent in the big smoke

It can be hard to save money on rent, especially when you live in the more expensive cities in Australia, like Sydney or Perth.

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Kristy Paltridge
High-end handbag or property purchase: Here’s how the two investment strategies stack up

A handbag that is 10 years old and in “grade-two condition” last month sold in London for $289,338 (£162,500).

For context, less than two weeks later an apartment in inner-Melbourne sold for $7000 less than that. It’s nice, too – hardwood floors, two parking spaces, and so on.

So, which is likely to be the more lucrative investment? Judging by the problematic gauge of past market performance, a case could actually be made for the handbag.

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Kristy Paltridge
Why you need to start budgeting now for Christmas

Christmas is a time of joy. It’s also a time of big credit card debt. One way to avoid this is to hold a no-spend Christmas instead. The average credit card debt in Australia was $3223.70 in July.

Last year, Finder.com assessed the average credit card debt after the festive season was $1666 and that 82% of Australians would take six months to pay off their Christmas credit card debt.

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Kristy Paltridge